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Southwestern Brooklyn

sub-borough
New York, United States

Southwestern Brooklyn

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553 homes
$568,000
2 bed 739 sqft
$1,499,999
8 bed 2905 sqft
$264,900
1 bed 650 sqft
$1,549,000
4 bed 1767 sqft
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  • Avatar of Kendrick Shields
    Kendrick Shields
    Bensonhurst
    6 Sep
    As a resident of Bensonhurst, the neighborhood here has a quiet nightlife, good amount of schools nearby, extremely safe and has many buses and trains nearby. The only downside is the houses here are quite expensive. Bensonhurst is an overall good neighborhood to be in.
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  • Homeless Shelter on Bath Ave was cancelled. https://shorefrontnews.com/2022/08/01/homeless-shelter-on-bath-ave-cancelled/
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  • Avatar of Scott Leventon
    Avatar of Scott Leventon
    Things to know about #MovingtoNYC on a budget: - Get ready to pay more for less: whether it’s your apartment, bar tab, or dinner, everything is more expensive in #NewYorkCity. - Only bring a car if you need it: parking and driving in New York City is a nightmare, and finding a monthly parking garage is near unaffordable. - Take care of yourself: life is fast in New York, sometimes you need to slow down and take a break from the partying and late nights. What are your tips for moving to NYC?!
    1253, 63rd Street, 1253, 63rd Street, New York, New York, United States
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Explore available real estate
Other +1
$568,000
For sale
6422 Bay Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 11204
2 bed1 bath739 sqft$769/sqft
Listing by: E REALTY INTERNATIONAL CORP.
  • Bensonhurst is home to my favorite Brooklyn Public Library. "The Highlawn branch is located at 1664 West 13th Street, near the intersection with Kings Highway. The branch was renovated in 2005–2006. Unlike most other BPL branches, it contains a circular reading room with multicolored walls." Highlawn is such a great place to bring my remote work for the day. Have you been? We're so lucky to have this library in our community.
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  • Growing up, we would visit Little Italy for every special occasion. The smell of the Italian bakeries in Bensonhurst still makes my heart sing! I think it's time to being my own kids here for our celebrations. What is the quickest way to get here from Times Square during rush hour?
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  • • Shop Liberty View Industrial Plaza: This plaza is known as a parents shopping paradise. The modern, sparkling clean, and so impressive Liberty View Industrial Plaza is a must visit for everyone. You can find almost everything here. • Dine at the Food Hall at Industry City: Eat your heart out Brooklyn. From Korean comfort food to Instagram-famous Avocado toasts, Industry City's Food Hall is a delicious culinary gathering place. • Eat Dumplings: Despite its scale and quality, Sunset Park’s Chinatown remains the least visited of New York’s major Chinatowns, with Flushing and Manhattan’s Chinatown boasting bigger culinary dining destination statuses. But it’s a worthy contender and is home to some of the city’s best Chinese food. Though the initial Chinese migrants to Sunset Park were Cantonese, those coming from the Fujian Province have increased over the last 20 years and with it, so has the community’s need for a wide array of Chinese food. Regional offerings are rich and plentiful. Below, find some top picks — from top-notch dim sum to flaming, numbing whole fresh fish. Come hungry, be respectful, and as always, bring cash. • Tour Green-Wood Cemetery Green-wood is also one of the most beautiful cemeteries. There are grand public monuments, as well as stunning family shrines, private mausoleums, and even catacombs. Some consider it to be one of the finest 19th-century and 20th-century "open-air galleries" of neo-renaissance, neo-classical, and Victorian-style statues. Because of its historic significance as well as its beautiful monuments, headstones, and landscaping, a tour of Green-wood Cemetery will not disappoint.
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  • Swaths of residential row houses, originally built in the late 1800s and early 1900s, still stand side-by-side in many parts of Sunset Park, uninterrupted by the stray glass facade of a new development. Architecture buffs also praise the way the neighborhood's bow-front brownstones coalesce to create a visual rhythm you don't find in many other parts of the city. (For prime examples, walk down 43rd Street between Seventh and Eighth Avenues, or 47th Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues.) There's a smattering of original Finnish coops, including the Alku and Alku Toinen (on 43rd Street between Eighth and Ninth)—thought to be the first nonprofit cooperatives in NYC. In other parts of the neighborhood (like 40th Street between Fourth and Fifth Avenues), you'll find a repetition of near-identical apartment buildings rendered in various color brick. Another local architectural attraction: St. Michael's Roman Catholic Church, designed by beaux-arts architect Raymond F. Almirall. The church's beehive spire tops off what was once one of Brooklyn's tallest structures. And while Sunset Park doesn't have as burgeoning an art scene as some other up-and-coming neighborhoods, it does have Tabla Rasa, a gallery that often presents group shows in its turn-of-the-20th-century carriage house.
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  • Originally part of Bay Ridge, the area got its own name with the creation of Sunset Park in 1891. Today, the neighborhood extends from Prospect Expressway to 65th Street and Eighth Avenue to the waterfront. Sunset Park’s first major development began after the Civil War when manufacturing enterprises were established on its waterfront. Beginning in the 1880s, the inland area developed as a residential neighborhood for middle- and working-class families, including many who worked on the waterfront. A major stimulant to its growth was the establishment in 1889 of a ferry service to and from Manhattan at Second Avenue and 39th Street. Sunset Park’s first waves of immigrants were Irish, German, and Scandinavian, but by the late 19th century, immigrants from Italy, Greece, and Poland also arrived. To accommodate them, large swaths of rowhouses were built. Puerto Rican and other Latin American populations began settling here in the 1940s, and large numbers of Asian immigrants arrived in the 1980s, establishing Brooklyn’s first and New York City’s third “Chinatown.” Sunset Park’s standout building type is the masonry rowhouse. In fact, Sunset Park contains one of the earliest and most extensive concentrations of two-family masonry rowhouses in the city. Mostly built between 1885 and 1912, these stunning blocks are accented by commercial thoroughfares and institutional and religious buildings mostly completed by the early 1930s. #history #sunsetpark
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  • 1. Off-Broadway Week shows and casual corner slices EAT casual before the show at Corner Slice and dig into a piece (or two) of the vodka sauce slice and chicken parm hero. DO catch an Off-Broadway Week performance of Drunk Shakespeare and take a friend for the 2-for-1 ticket deal to enjoy the hilarious show together. DRINK like the performers at rustic-chic spot La Pulpería and toast to a fun night out with black lava-salted sips and pineapple-topped cocktails. 2. Celebrate Black History Month at these Black-owned businesses EAT chic on Friday at Massawa and dine on traditional Ethiopian dishes from vegan spicy lentils to tender sirloin plates. DO shop local for your wine at Liquid Assets and take home a bottle of red Saturday night to enjoy in the comfort of your own home. DRINK healthy on Sunday with a ginger-based juice from Uptown Veg & Juice to end the weekend on a sweet note! 3. End date night with a cereal bar EAT with your partner at Creole restaurant Sugar Factory and share a plate of beignet sliders in this rustic-chic space. DO grab dessert up the street at Milk and Cream Cereal Bar for a breakfast-inspired treat! DRINK to keep the night going at nearby Sweet Afton and try one of their cleverly-named cocktails like the coconut-infused Cat's Pajamas. #food #boroughpark
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  • 1. A city within a city Many would likely be surprised to learn of the booming city within New York City. The 6 million-square-foot Industry City is a man-made “microcosm of NYC,” equipped with a 40,000-square-foot food hall, over five acres of open space, and more than 400 companies from verticals ranging from fashion to film production to tech. 2. It’s one of the most beautiful neighborhoods In the early 1900s when many of Sunset Park’s structures went up, uniformity was not exactly trending. On any given block in the Brooklyn neighborhood, classical brownstones, funky brick buildings, and rugged limestone structures all share space on the city streets. The neighborhood, which promises a change of scenery at every turn (literally), never ceases to surprise. 3. It’s home to one of the city’s most exciting food and drink scenes Thanks in part to its diverse residents and old-meets-new vibe, Sunset Park boasts some of New York City’s most unique dining and drinking. Here, no-frills mid-century Irish pubs are neighbors with trendy vodka distilleries. When searching for something worth washing down, count on the area’s top taquerias, where some of the best Mexican cuisines on the East Coast is enjoyed with abandon. #sunsetpark #reasons
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