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Prospect Park

neighborhood
New York, United States

Prospect Park

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  • Avatar of Rosalie Lesser
    Rosalie Lesser
    Prospect Park
    15 Apr
    It’s the perfect time of year to check out the cherry blossoms at the Brooklyn botanic garden 🌸🍒
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  • It’s the perfect time of year to check out the cherry blossoms at the Brooklyn botanic garden 🌸🍒
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  • There are many historic homes in the borough of Brooklyn and one of the oldest can be found right inside the park. The Lefferts Homestead, located at 452 Flatbush Ave, was originally built in the farming village of Flatbush. Today, the quaint Dutch style home sits in Prospect Park, six blocks from its original location. Built in 1783 after a previous structure was burnt down by American soldiers in the Revolution, the building was home to the Lefferts family, one of the wealthiest and most influential families in Brooklyn at the time. In order to save the home from threats of new development, the John Leffert’s estate offered it to the city of New York in 1917 with the promise it be moved onto city owned property. The relocation ensured the home would be preserved for generations to come. The home now operates at the Lefferts Historic House museum where visitors can try their hand at 18th-century activities like candle making and butter churning while exploring the beautiful gardens and historic artifacts inside the house.
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  • “Wildman” Steve Brill leads foraging tours of New York area parks, including Prospect Park. Technically foraging is illegal in the city parks, and in the 1980s, Brill was arrested by a NY Parks Rangers for eating a dandelion. The arrest only served to enliven Brill’s foraging career and he eventually became an official Parks Department naturalist. For many years now, he has runs tours independently, though sometimes with his daughter. Brill’s tours are part of his mission to promote urban agriculture and sustainable eating. He has published three books on wild eating, consulted for the Parks department and advised several New York chefs on sustainable ingredient choices. You can learn more about Brill and his tours in Secret Brooklyn.
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  • Let's recall some past memories: Off of Center Drive, there are 2,000 gravestones and buried bodies, much older than the park itself. This property, the only private property in the park, is a cemetery owned by the Religious Society of Friends, more commonly known as Quakers. Established in 1849, though it is believed there are graves that date to the 1820s, the 10-acre Quaker cemetery remains active to this day. In the original plan for the park by civil engineer Egbert Viele, which would have made the park about 55% smaller, the cemetery wasn’t even within the bounds. It is easy to miss as it is in a fenced-off area of woods and the stones are small and simple. Buried inside are a few famous Quakers such as Raymond Ingersoll, a former Brooklyn Borough President, and actor Montgomery Clift. #prospectpark #history
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  • Recently I had the pleasure of going to one of the most incredible places in New York City. One of my friends is a plant geek. He probably remembers this place inside out and always talks about it. So, when we entered from the Eastern Parkway, we were introduced to a new world, a world of plants. The gardens here get exceptional care, and the staff is pretty professional. There were many people with kids, and the families were enjoying themselves. They loved the flower beds. The kids were primarily attracted to the visual presentations of the Garden. I think it was an excellent experience for me because I felt much closer to nature and its most crucial aspect: plant life. The local families can teach their kids many things about plant kinds. Are you a plant lover? If you are not, you must go to Brooklyn Botanic Garden. I am sure when you return you will be in love with plants. Which area of Brooklyn do you reside in? Have you ever been to these gardens?
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    Brooklyn Botanic Garden, 990 Washington Ave, New York, New York 11238, United States
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