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Flatbush

neighborhood
New York, United States

Flatbush

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19 homes
$508,000
1 bed 1084 sqft
$560,000
$220,000
550 sqft
$1,600,000
7 bed 2204 sqft
10 groups
Cooking Club Flatbush
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  • Avatar of Ayesha Mustafa
    Ayesha Mustafa
    Flatbush
    23 Mar
    Flatbush Junction is a very safe neighborhood, however there are still pockets of Flatbush that are dangerous. Considering it's only a few trains stops from Downtown Brooklyn, is very affordable to live here in comparison to other parts of Brooklyn such as Borough Hall, Cobble Hill, Williamsburg, Greenpoint. Flatbush is in Kings County. Living in Flatbush offers residents a dense urban feel and most residents rent their homes. In Flatbush there are a lot of bars, restaurants, coffee shops, and parks. Many families and young professionals live in Flatbush and residents tend to be liberal. The public schools in Flatbush are above average.
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  • • Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts is a high-class performance venue located on the Brooklyn College campus. It has been the epicenter of Flatbush culture since its opening in 1954. Featuring world-renowned performers like Itzhak Perlman, Ray Charles, and Ladysmith Black Mambazo, it could charge through the nose like its Manhattan counterparts, but the Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts remains committed to the community, always offering its shows at affordable prices. As its website says, ‘the Center’s mission is to introduce young people to the performing arts, enhance their creativity and expose them to new cultures and ideas.’ Let’s hope it can continue to do that for many years to come. • Café Madeline From its sign advertising ‘COFFEEEEEEEE’ (sic)to the mid-century modern light fixtures and unabashedly unfinished walls, Café Madeline touts a bold style. But it also touts outstanding food and coffee. Serving up the rich, chocolatey coffee of Toby’s Estate — one of the city’s best roasters — in large ceramic mugs, this café knows the importance of quality. Add to this its artisanal breakfast sandwiches, gorgeous salads, and fresh pastries, and you’ve found yourself the perfect brunch spot. And if you’re feeling particularly adventurous, try their Cold-Brew Nitro; a coffee-soda drink, served fresh from the tap. Café Madeline’s window sums it up nicely: ‘It’s good because we care.’ • The Street Art of Juan Carlos Pinto Juan Carlos Pinto is a prolific local artist who’s poured a lot of love into the area. Two blocks from Café Madeline, on the corner of Cortelyou and Marlborough, you can see his portraits of John Lennon and Richard Pryor, made out of painted squares. But Pinto has murals throughout the area, notably at P.S. 217, the Q Gardens lot, and Newkirk Plaza. #flatbush
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  • Flatbush is home to a number of elementary and intermediate schools, as well as the Erasmus Hall High School campus. Founded in 1786, it has a long list of famous alumni. Its building has been expanded numerous times and is notable for its relatively unique architecture. Well-known institutions within Flatbush include Erasmus Hall High School, the Parade Ground, the Flatbush Dutch Reformed Church, and Brooklyn College. The neighborhood also contained Ebbets Field, the last Brooklyn home of the Brooklyn Dodgers baseball team before it was demolished in 1960; however, due to imprecise boundaries, the Ebbets Field site may also be considered to be in Crown Heights. The Kings Theatre, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, operated from 1929 to 1977; it reopened as a live show venue in February 2015 after extensive renovations. #flatbush
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Explore available real estate
Other +5
$508,000
For sale
2108 Dorchester Road, Brooklyn, NY 11226
1 bed1 bath1084 sqft$469/sqft
Listing by: RE/MAX Edge
$560,000
For sale
819 East 22nd Street, Brooklyn, NY 11210
Listing by: SOWAE CORP
  • One major shopping area in Flatbush is a five block stretch of Church Avenue between Rogers Avenue and New York Avenue. Although this area cannot be said to be complete illustrations of the whole immigrant neighborhood, it is representative of businesses found in typical West Indian Communities. Moreover, the businesses in the community reflect the culture, economics, and values of the neighborhood of an amazing West Indian mixture. The businesses found in this five block stretch were tallied in order to find out which businesses serviced the transmigrant community. Our findings are posted here. We counted a total of 95 stores in the area surveyed. Approximately 15 percent of these businesses were beauty oriented, including nail and hair salons, and African hair braiding establishments. Another 15 percent were restaurants, including roti restaurants, bakeries, Chinese restaurants, and franchises such as Golden Krust and McDonalds. Eight percent of the businesses in Flatbush were for entertainment, which included CD, DVD, or book stores, African movie stores, or electronics stores. Other notable businesses included travel agencies, day care centers, and pharmacies, each comprising three percent of the entire pool of businesses. These are only a small sample of the many places that serve the East Flatbush community.
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  • The primary commercial strips are Flatbush, Church, and Coney Island Avenues. One can find Caribbean food, Soul food, Chinese, Mexican, and South Asian restaurants. Most of the businesses are small, with some larger businesses also present. A large part of the culture in Flatbush is the use of "dollar vans". Flatbush housing varies in character. It generally features apartment buildings, though some rowhouses also are present. Older, Victorian-style housing can be found in Prospect Park South, and brownstones are in Prospect Lefferts Gardens. The Flatbush community has been receiving an influx of immigrants from the Caribbean, mostly from Guyana, Haiti, Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica, Grenada, Barbados, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Dominica, Antigua and Barbuda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, and Belize,[citation needed] since the 1980s, as well as immigrants from South Asia, primarily India, Pakistan and Bangladesh and African countries like Ghana, Zimbabwe, Nigeria, and Kenya. Haitians are the largest ethnic group in Flatbush. Prior to the arrival of these groups, the Flatbush community had already been diverse, with many Italian-Americans, Irish-Americans, African-Americans, and Jewish-Americans. According to the 2020 census data from the New York City Department of City Planning showed a diverse racial population, though the concentrations of each racial groups varied between different sections of Flatbush. Western Flatbush had between 10,000 to 19,999 White residents, 5,000 to 9,999 Black residents, and each the Hispanic and Asian populations were between 5,000 to 9,999 residents. Eastern Flatbush had between 30,000 to 39,999 Black residents, 10,000 to 19,999 Hispanic residents, and 5,000 to 9,999 White residents.
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